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More Than I Can Say

Inserisci l'indirizzo e-mail fornito in fase di registrazione e richiedi il reset della password. In caso di problemi scrivi a platform rockol. Ci occorre da parte tua l'accettazione esplicita dei nostri termini di servizio. Ti invieremo un link di verifica all'indirizzo fornito in fase di registrazione. Cerca i testi delle tue canzoni preferite Trova. X Factor - Parlano i finalisti dell'edizione Accetta solo fotografie non esclusive, destinate a utilizzo su testate e, quindi, libere da diritti. I know some of you will say it depends.

My question is which is better without any context given? More than is mainly used to express the fact I cannot say. I love you so deep, but I cannot express my love for reasons, maybe too shy to tell you. As its literally meaning, my love for you is beyond words.

More Than I Can Say

A classic instance is there has been years for an old-married couple did not say "I love you" to each other, but what they did everyday are much greater than the cheap words "I love you". Or maybe you guys have a more plausible interpretation? Looking forward to your reply! It's not really either of those; to me, it means "mere words are not sufficient to express how much I love you.

MORE THAN I CAN SAY - Leo Sayer - www.juraa.com

Mar 22, Adri rated it liked it. It certainly is a page-turner, a fast read. But I am in two minds about this book. I wish I could explain my dithering. Maybe once I have had time to digest it a bit I'll be able to say more. For the moment though I think this is worth at least 3. May 23, Emmie rated it really liked it.

It is refreshing to read a novel written by a male writer for a change. This novel has been well crafted and focuses largely on characterisation and political issues surrounding the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. There are suspenseful moments and unexpected twists in the story. What I find interesting is the multi textured element of the novel that touches on the protagonist's post war trauma and his failed past relationships as well as the political climate and the whole purpose of military invol It is refreshing to read a novel written by a male writer for a change.

What I find interesting is the multi textured element of the novel that touches on the protagonist's post war trauma and his failed past relationships as well as the political climate and the whole purpose of military involvement in active war zones. The ultimate question surrounding events in the novel is 'What really is the purpose of life and how do we find meaning and fulfillment out of it?

Whether or not this is a sign of Alzheimer's, I don't know. Either way, it means I spent this time rereading a mediocre novel when j could have read any one of a gazillion it's a bad sign when you pick a book to read for what you think is the first time, only to discover you've read it before. Either way, it means I spent this time rereading a mediocre novel when j could have read any one of a gazillion previously unread books that potentially could have provided at least a little more pleasure.

Nov 02, Adva rated it it was ok Shelves: That was my first reaction when I finished the book. Since I have been out of reading for so long, and my main bulk of reading is not done in the department of this particular genre, I cannot say whether my 'gulping' of the book, i. So the first, and one of the only, point for this book is the way it dragged me in and made it hard for me to put down. As a result, I finished reading it at 3 in the morning.

It is an easy read, fairly straight forward in general , and moves along quite quickly.

More Than I Can Say — an excerpt

You don't tread in place for very long, or at all. However, it does leave some scenes wanting, though it is not plagued with the had-an-idea-so-I-ran-with-it-but-forgot-to-go-back-and-add-details feeling. They rarely are anymore, the basic twists and turns are pretty much expected. However, too blatant foreshadowing ruins even the most trivial story lines.

First Person Narration is mostly hurt if not mostly plagued by it, because once a character hints at a possibility and then ignores it, big, red, neon signs are lit up "danger, danger". When it is repeated, it also makes the character seem, well, to put it bluntly, dumb. Add to that a character whose mantra is "don't think", and you, as a reader, get the feeling that someone offended your intelligence. Also, I know that most books have an agenda, a point, other than the plot, that they want to get across. Well, not books, but their writers.


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I'm aware that the matter of subtlety in this matter has been lost, or, rather, the ability to pass said point elegantly. While some books shove it down your throat, others, as this book, manage to make it quite delicate. Problem was, that while delicate, a it could be seen a mile away though I've already mentioned the subtlety issue ; and b it was not compelling.

I did not read the opening notes I never do before I read the book, a clean start , so I did not know what he was aiming at, but it was pretty clear almost for the start. To make it clear, he's trying to make a point about PTSD and the society's handling of army veterans in general. While it was obvious he aimed at these issues, I felt he missed them.

I felt the main character was messed-up before he joined the army with the very little information we have on how he was before , and afterwards he just seemed psychotic regardless of his service. I think bringing this very important issue on the table requires a different genre altogether, or a longer and more psychological book, one that isn't focused on the action, but rather the REaction. Despite the good intentions and the characterization of a man incapable of real emotional connection who's trying not to think, it didn't come off as a PTSD, but rather as an obnoxious and unrelatable character.


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  6. It the book, the story, the character needs more depth, more poking fingers into the unpleasant places. More rawness, jabbing a hot poker into the wound. It's a bit too willy-nilly on this important issue. I have trouble with books where I find the main character unpleasing. It is a serious problem when the terms I'd use to describe a character are: Stupid, emotionally numb, and psychotic.

    Of course, when we're talking about a character who is supposed to evoke empathy, it is even worse.

    More than I can say

    At the end, despite all that happened and could happen, two things occurred that annoyed me: A forced happy ending - I am quite allergic to those, especially in non-romance literature not that the forced happy endings in romance don't give me the hives, it's just they are more genre acceptable. While I guess some would argue it is not necessarily a happy ending it is quite an open one , I still feel it is, especially because it feels forced. It doesn't feel natural, just sort of a filler to tie a loose end and to give hope to our beloved hero.

    I would see it end in a completely different way. Mind you, I am talking strictly about the last chapter, an afterward of sorts, and not the resolution of the mystery plot. Despite all that has gone through, despite all the realizations and enlightenment our hero had gone through, he has not evolved or grown one single centimeter. He stayed the same, but, mainly because of point 1, it doesn't seem like a human being that got stuck in place, rather like a book character that has not evolved.

    And in such a story, with such revelations, progress must be made. To sum it up: I didn't like the main character, the moral seemed forced, and the ending fake. However, it is written in an engaging way, and the action plot is quite an interesting one though not entirely innovative. I probably will not read this book again, but I cannot say that I would stay away from other books by the same writer. Apr 01, Gillian rated it liked it. Nowhere near as good as "Salmon Fishing in the Yemen" but probably deserves more than the okay rating of two stars.

    Aug 26, Birgitt Krumboeck rated it it was amazing. I absolutely loved it! An excellent take on the Western war "effort" in Iraq and Afghanistan Mar 14, Lakes Claire rated it really liked it. Listened to this as an audio book, narrated by Jonathan Keeble. Jul 29, Phillipa rated it it was ok. It was an okay read. Didn't really grab me. Not something that will come to mind if someone asked for recommendations. Mar 12, Matthew rated it liked it. Enjoyed the character of Richard Gaunt and chaotic if ludicrous lifestyle but felt the novel slightly over indulgent as Gaunt looks back to experiences in Afghanistan.

    Mar 12, Gaye rated it really liked it. Love his books but this one talking about Iraqi subcontractors, rendition, torture and madness was less enjoyable than others. After taking a rather long time over Middlemarch this was the antidote or rather, since that implies that wonderful book was poison, a foil, a contrast, a trou Normande to cleanse the palate after such rich fare. Torday did not disappoint and was a very quick-reading page turner of a thriller. When we meet him he is in the process of messing up his civilian life, seemingly able to see where he is going wrong, losing fiancee, money and employment, but still unable to stop himself making the wrong choices and unable to hold back from flaring into violence or succumbing to the temptation of other vices.

    Richard seems to have had a fairly privileged upbringing and officer-training but is now unable to pay the rent, yet still gambling and having alienated himself from the love of his life. At this point he actually wins a few hands of cards at the gambling club to which he belongs, and accepts a rather more bizarre bet to reach a place in Oxford by a certain time the following day - on foot.

    This is where, by a chance encounter with a nasty minion of the villain of the piece, Richard's life changes and the story changes gear. From then on we are enmeshed in the world of terrorism, the secret services and the complex background to the "War on Terror" including Richard Gaunt's own part in it as a former soldier. It is certainly a political book on one level but also a very human one. Torday's sympathies to some extent lie with the human beings on all sides of the conflict and while, like many people, he can support and respect the soldiers, he does so without believing in the desirability or "winability" of the conflict in Afghanistan.

    He also, without justifying their actions, gives us an insight into the motivations of the other side. In the end Richard is an interesting "hero", in many ways far from admirable but with a battered and rough and ready sense of justice intact. At the end of the book he seems not to have earned the redemption you might expect.

    Torday does not make it that easy for us and the story ends fairly abruptly, letting us to some extent decide what will become of him. Have the action and further horrors helped him over his post traumatic shock syndrome?

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    It seems unlikely, and although he has made a few faltering steps towards recovering his life, the hints are also pointing to his returning to his old ways. Torday's characters have a tendency to resurface in his other books and I, for one, would be very interested to hear more about Mr Gaunt.


    1. More Than I Can www.juraa.com3.
    2. Home Sanctuary: Declutter, Simplify, and Relax the Natural Way!
    3. Waiting for the Butterflies : -Finding God in Everyday Places-.
    4. (Leo Sayer).
    5. He would make an ideal serial action hero in the classic noble-but-flawed tradition, but for the moment we will have to make do with the fact that his friend or at least poker opponent Ed Hartlepool has got his own novel. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Whoever wrote the blurb on the back of this book did a brilliant job.

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      That's why I brought this book; it sounded like exactly the kind of book I was hoping to read after having read a string of books I haven't really enjoyed. Inevitably, I was setting myself up for disappointment My favourite aspect of this book was the description of Richard's flash backs of his time at war and his struggles coping with civilian life and other people's reactions to the military intervention in Afghanistan and Whoever wrote the blurb on the back of this book did a brilliant job.

      My favourite aspect of this book was the description of Richard's flash backs of his time at war and his struggles coping with civilian life and other people's reactions to the military intervention in Afghanistan and Iraq. The scenes and dialogue relating to this were written superbly; vivid and honest - the grey areas between black and white - brought out my only compassion and respect for this character. Too bad the other material in the story wasn't written to the same standard